Shire of Beverly Crest   National Trust Logo AVONDALE PRIORITIES

Avondale is a place of regional and State heritage significance, intertwining the history of early European settlement, culture and tradition of the Ballardong Aboriginal people and a journey that envelops the development of agriculture in this state.

Avondale integrates natural, Aboriginal and historic cultural heritage in a sustainable way to provide farm-based educational and tourism experience generating social, economic and environmental benefit to the local, regional and wider community.

A Master Plan was prepared for Avondale in 2011 and key recommendations are summarised below. We welcome your thoughts, ideas and proposals on these identified priorities.

Please take a few minutes to complete our survey online (click here) or alternatively you can download the survey to complete and return to either:

* SHIRE OF BEVERLEY

Email:  admin@beverley.wa.gov.au
Postal: PO Box 20, Beverley WA 6304
In Person: 136 Vincent St, Beverley (Mon - Fri, 8.30am - 4.00pm)

or

 * NATIONAL TRUST OF WESTERN AUTRALIA

Email:  trust@ntwa.com.au
Postal: PO Box 1162 West Perth WA 6872

Conserve remnant bushland

The 52 hectare bush reserve is recognised as significant for its high degree of biodiversity, priority flora and range of unusual species.

Weed control, revegetation, fire management and feral animal control is ongoing.

Conserve remnant bushland

maintain active farming

Arable land is leased to the adjacent land owner who continues a long tradition of farming which started with the establishment of the state's first agricultural research station in 1924.

Maintain active farming

Support volunteers

The Avondale Farm Project Association (AFPA) is a community body representing a wide range of persons interested in, and supportive of, Avondale.

Support volunteers

Improve public facilities

The picnic area has been upgraded. More work is required to improve public access, roads, carparks, paths, toilets and playground.

Wayfinding signage is not specifically identified in the master plan but is also important.

Improve public facilities

Adapt buildings for new uses

The homestead could be adapted to allow limited cafe operation during special events.

Further adaptation to the homestead to improve access, interpretation and education should be considered.

The Landcare Resource Centre building could be upgraded for community uses and as lecture/meeting rooms for the community and tour groups.
 Adapt buildings for new uses

Conserve and interpret historic buildings

The homestead, silo, garage, blacksmith shop, killing shed, weighbridge etc. are in need of conservation with interpretation for education and tourism benefits.

Conserve and interpret historic buildings

 Develop commercial ventures

The aquaculture ponds for example could be redeveloped as a commercial venture with tourism benefits.

Facilities for school groups, corporates or other teams could be developed on site.

The Master plan identifies this as low priority and unlikely to be commercially viable.

Develop commerical ventures

Caravan park and camping ground

Serviced caravan and camping facilities are not considered economically viable and may poach custom from Shire facility. 

Casual caravan parking and camping could acceptable for events.

Caravan park and camping ground

Maintain buildings for operational use

The former seed grading shed, shearing shed, header and hay sheds should be continued for operational farm use as required and for educational/ tourism benefits where appropriate.

Maintain buildings for operational use

Conserve and interpret historic buildings

The historic stables building has a new roof and other urgent works have been completed.

It should be retained as stables and additional interpretation, education and tourism opportunities explored as a major drawcard.

Work should continue with the Clydesdale Horse Association.

Conserve and interpret historic buildings

Continue a program of special events

Special events such as a Harvest Festival and Clydesdale Ploughing Day are a major tourism drawcard, community focus and educational vehicle.

They can provide an important income stream and should be co-ordinated with other local and regional events for community cross-benefit.

Continue a program of special events

Promote Aboriginal cultural heritage values and business opportunities

Engage the Aboriginal community in activities at Avondale, and create opportunities for enhanced educational and tourism programs based on Aboriginal cultural knowledge for the social and economic benefit of all stakeholders.

Develop small scale, self-funding Aboriginal business opportunities with training components utilising resources at Avondale.

Promote Aboriginal cultural heritage values

Develop training programs

Training programs have been used to complete conservation of the stables building and could potentially be used for future conservation and other building projects.

Training programs could also be developed for flora and fauna management, including an on-site nursery. A nursery may provide a modest income stream from sale of plants.

Programs could also be developed for farm and land management, tourism, volunteer training and upskilling etc.

Develop training programs

Develop education programs

Develop education programs around contemporary farming, farming history with reference to collections of buildings and settings.

The machinery museum, the natural environment and its integration with the farm, Aboriginal heritage and culture.

Educational programs will increase visitation/income and the overall value of Avondale to the broader community.

Develop education programs

Upgrade vacant buildings

Funding has been received for conservation and renovation of the houses for short or medium term accommodation to provide an income stream. This project is underway.

Upgrade vacant buildings

Develop trails

Development of trails in conjunction with the bush reserve and green links suitable for recreational use (walking, cycling) in appropriate areas will increase educational value and visitation.

Develop trails

Develop and implement interpretation

High quality interpretation is the key to enhancing visitors’ enjoyment and understanding of the place.

The interpretation plan should be developed and works implemented to improve visitor experience and appreciation of the site and its natural, Aboriginal and historic heritage values.

Develop and implement interpretation

Improve the museum display

The museum collection is owned by the Shire of Beverley and operated by volunteers who continue to work on cataloguing and conserving the collection as well as keeping the place open to the public.

A major restructure of the Farm Machinery Museum exhibition would improve presentation. A storage shed and workshop is needed to conserve machinery and facilitate volunteer activity.

Improve the museum display

Establish a public access control point

Overall site management and safety is needed and a point to facilitate income collection from visitation.

Establish a public access control point